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Register a death in Ireland

From: Department of Employment Affairs and Social Protection

How to register a death in Ireland

It is a legal requirement in Ireland that every death that takes place in the State must be recorded and registered.

Records of deaths in Ireland are held in the General Register Office, which is the civil repository for records relating to Births, Marriages, Civil Partnerships and Deaths in Ireland and in all Civil Registration Offices.

A death within the State can be registered with any Registrar, regardless of where it occurs. Deaths must be registered as soon as possible after the death and no later than three months from the date of death.

Following a death, a registered medical practitioner who attended the deceased must complete and sign part 1 of the Death Notification Form (DNF), stating to the best of his or her knowledge or belief the cause of death.

This form must be given to a relative or civil partner of the deceased, or if there are none, to another qualified informant. See list below of other qualified informants who may be required to register the death.

The qualified informant must complete and sign part 2 of the DNF which contains the particulars of the deceased required to complete the registration.

Once completed, the DNF must be given to a registrar within 3 months of the death.

The relative, civil partner, or other qualified informant must then sign the register in the presence of the registrar.

Qualified Informant

(a) A relative of the deceased who has knowledge of the required particulars

(b) a person present at the death

(c) any other person who has knowledge of the required particulars

(d) if the death occurred in a building used as a dwelling or a part of a building so used, any person who was in the building or part at the time of the death

(e) if the death occurred in a hospital or other institution or in a building or a part of a building occupied by any other organisation or enterprise, the chief officer of the institution, organisation or enterprise (by whatever name called) or a person authorised by the chief officer to perform his or her functions

(f) a person who found the body of the person concerned

(g) a person who took charge of that body

(h) the person who procured the disposal of that body

(i) any other person who has knowledge of the death

Rates

There is no charge to register a death that occurs in Ireland. Fees are charged for a copy of a death certificate.

A certificate is issued for social welfare purposes at a reduced cost. Evidence it is for social welfare purposes is required, such as a note from the Department of Employment Affairs and Social Protection.

The fees charged for a certificate are as follows:

  • €20 for a full standard certificate
  • €1 for a copy for social welfare purposes (letter from Department of Employment Affairs and Social Protection required)
  • €4 for an uncertified copy of an entry in the Register
  • €10 to have a certificate authenticated (only available from the General Register Office)

How to apply

Contact any local civil register office or the General Register Office to get a copy of a death certificate. If you are registering the death, you can get copies of the death certificate at the same time.

See here for information on how to apply for certificates.